Marriage and dating in china Free stranger naked camchat

Women, in particular, appear to be more focused on pragmatic qualities in prospective partners.

The influence of individualist values and the changing cultural norms pertaining to dating and familial roles are discussed.

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Understandably, this places great pressure upon unmarried sons to negotiate with his parents over the identification and selection of a suitable wife, who, in turn, will also provide assistance to his aging parents.For sons, in particular, “xiao” makes finding a spouse a priority and consequently makes dating take on a different quality.China is typically regarded as a collectivistic culture, in which obligations to the greater society and social institutions (e.g., the family) are considered more important than individual traits and needs (Kwang ).Thus, in order to best understand and appreciate the social dynamics occurring in present day China, one should first examine some of the important long-standing traditions connected to its culture.The traditional expectations concerning dating and marriage have a long history within Chinese culture and are based heavily upon ancestor worship and Confucian ideology.In China, marriage and family life continues to be a central element within Chinese culture, with adolescents and young adults typically assuming that they will eventually find a partner.What is lacking, however, is a broader understanding of how contemporary Chinese youth view dating and intimate relationships.From a generational perspective, dating and romantic relationships in China are regarded differently, as adolescents and young adults may have more progressive beliefs, as compared to their parents.Researchers have noted that Chinese parents tend to oppose adolescent dating (Chen et al.This, then, may lead young adults within collectivistic cultures to emphasize the pragmatic functions of dating and eventual marriage, while having less concern with notions of “love” and “romance” (Hsu ).The post-Mao Chinese government has steadily encouraged economic modernization and the development of economic practices based upon free market principles similar to those found in Westernized countries.

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